Home > conservative > Obama = George Bush. On steroids. Snorting coke. While driving his moped at 120 mph

Obama = George Bush. On steroids. Snorting coke. While driving his moped at 120 mph

Because I couldn't find one with a moped

In other words: he’s insane and a danger to us all.

We here at Why Not Nashville? like to make tongue-in-cheek references about U.S. troops going into a sovereign nation in the middle of the night and shooting an unarmed man in the face (Osama), or sending drones into another sovereign country and shooting an unarmed, American citizen, in the face (this time with a missile) (Anwar al-Awlaki), as if to say that those things are wrong.  Obviously, I’m as in favor of blowing up terrorists as the next guy, and since my government would NEVER lie to me about someone’s guilt, I’ll safely assume that both of the foregoing gentlemen were dangerous terrorists.  After removing my tongue from my cheek though, I think everyone has to have a little bit of a problem with our government executing an actual citizen without due process.  Especially when all he’s doing is sitting on a dirt floor somewhere talking about how much he hates America.  I mean, if that was all it took, why haven’t we executed the entire Democratic party (ZING)?

But those guys were foreigners, so we don’t really care; and it’s not happening here.  What, it’s happening here too?  Yep.  Maybe not the killing part, but the scooping-up of American citizens and indefinitely detaining them without so much as charging them with a crime is happening here (See alleged wikileaker Pfc. Bradley Manning).  Well, it’s about to get a whole lot worse.  Your government is just about done passing a law that will allow the military to detain an American citizen, any American citizen, for an indefinite period of time, if he or she is suspected of being a terrorist/or annoying the president while he’s filling out his March Madness brackets.  The following was actually said on the Senate Floor, during the debate over the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act:

‘It is not unfair to make an American citizen account for the fact that they decided to help Al Qaeda to kill us all and hold them as long as it takes to find intelligence about what may be coming next,’ remarked [Lindsey] Graham. ‘And when they say, ‘I want my lawyer,’ you tell them, ‘Shut up. You don’t get a lawyer.’

What the crap?  What country is this?  When did we suddenly embrace Ivan Drago and deride that plucky southpaw from Philly?  Yes, yes, a thousand times YES…they get a lawyer.  Unfair?  It’s friggin’ unconstitutional.  Well, probably not the constitution we have now, but you know what I mean.

And for you idiots who are about to say, “but we’re only talking about Al Qaeda, or some other middle-eastern terrorist group,” shut it.  First, unless you were born about five minutes ago, we’re talking about our government here.  These are the same people who spend billions of dollars subsidizing cars that burst into flames when you use the defrost…while telling us its for the environment!  In other words, even if we assume their motives are good, they’re still morons.  Second, most of the time, their motives aren’t good.  They’re simply doing what’s in their best interest.  Third, it’s not just Al Qaeda we’re talking about.  It’s any “terrorist group.”  Is the Michigan Militia a terrorist group?  How about Occupy Wall Street?

Am I paranoid?  Probably.  Or…

Senator McCain also told Rand Paul during a hearing on the bill that American citizens could be declared an enemy combatant, sent to Guantanamo Bay and detained indefinitely, ‘no matter who they are.’

This is incredible.  For several reasons.  It’s incredible because of how quickly it’s moving through a Congress that can’t agree on what day it is.  It’s incredible that the president that is about to sign it into law was elected by a bunch of hippies from the ACLU.  In fact, it’s incredible that this bill is causing me to agree with those hippies on something.

I’d tell you to call your Representative and complain, but they don’t actually care what you think (since you’ll forget about all of this by next week).  Instead, I would recommend you learn how to hang pictures, because you’re about to be replacing that 46″ plasma with a giant portrait of The Leader.

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  1. December 18, 2011 at 1:30 PM

    Obviously non US citizens are only about half human–if a society truly believes in justice, shouldn’t such “justice” apply to all human beings as opposed to that very small percentage of the world’s population that fortuitously happen to be US citizens? Why the distinguishing between the two?

  2. December 18, 2011 at 1:32 PM

    Obviously non US citizens are only about half human–if a society truly believes in justice, shouldn’t such “justice” apply to all human beings as opposed to that very small percentage of the world’s population that fortuitously happen to be US citizens? Why the distinguishing between the two?

  3. December 20, 2011 at 10:09 AM

    I agree with your general sentiment that imprisoning or executing anyone, absent due process, is wrong. I also have a problem with killing a man, even OBL who was a soldier on the battlefield, as he was apparently unarmed. With that said, our government’s primary purpose is to protect its citizens, and I believe killing OBL fell within that purpose.

    Detaining or killing U.S. citizens is much different, however (regardless of “justice”). The Constitution applies to U.S. citizens; it does not apply to non-citizens (arguably). If we have a president deliberately violating the Constitution, then we have a much larger problem then killing an unarmed terrorist in Pakistan.

  4. December 29, 2011 at 6:35 AM

    If you are in fact expressing the same outrage over the killing of OSB as the killing of Awlaki, then I can pretty much agree with you.

    However, I doubt that I extend quite the same reverence to the Constitution that you do. A guide for government (constitution) should reflect the deepest, most sincere beliefs and principles of the society to be governed by it as well providing for the functional changes of that society that occur.

    Allowing for the fact that the last eighty years have seen as great functional change as perhaps all of previous history, I believe our constitution is particularly lacking in the latter category.

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